FAQs

Product care

Category: Product care

I don’t recommend some sheepskins, such as Icelandic and Mongolian/Tibetan sheepskins as rugs due to the length and fineness of the wool, which felts easily. Australian and Chinese Han sheepskins make good rugs. Calf and goat skins make good rugs. Rabbit skins are too fragile to use as rugs, even when backed with other fabric.

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Category: Product care

Although they can be hand washed in warm water, I recommend that you don’t wash them unless you really have to. Sheepskins shouldn’t be laid on the floor if they will be walked on with shoes. This will make them dirty very quickly. To keep your rugs clean, take them outside regularly and shake them out. If they get a mark on them, use a damp cloth to wipe it off. If you do wash your skin, use cold or warm water with a little dishwashing detergent, and hand wash. Never use bleach or laundry detergent, and never wash in a washing machine, or place in a dryer. Squeeze out water and hang on a washing line or drape over a fence outside to dry.

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Category: Product care

Please check the hide care page

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Category: Product care

Please check the ‘sheepskin care’ page

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Ethical questions

Category: Ethical questions

Yes, I don’t usually have them on hand because they are too expensive for most people to buy, but I can get them. Alpaca skins in particular come from peru from animals that die. These alpacas are very valuable to the small people in the mountains who are poor, so to get a small amount of money for the skins of dead animals helps to feed their other stock. I can also get skins from wild boar, feral cats, etc.

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Category: Ethical questions

I have a number of sources, from a small, local abattoir, local hunters, to small abattoirs and tanneries overseas. I don’t offer skins from animals killed for their skins, or those reared in feedlots or intensive farming. Most of my skins come from small farms here in Australia, and small villages in other countries.

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Category: Ethical questions

These are from baby animals that are born dead. Farmers don’t like to leave these dead animals in their paddocks and it is a loss of income for them, so I come and take the skins. These ‘slinkskins’ have been used by many clothing manufacturers to make high end gloves, clothing, and bags. Many animal rights groups tell you that sheep are killed to collect the unborn babies. This is not true and I wish this myth would die. The ewes are worth much more than one tiny skin, even if that skin used to be worth a lot in the past.

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Business questions

Category: Business questions

Yes, I can offer wholesale prices to businesses, please contact me.

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Category: Business questions

My own tanning is done in my backyard with only a couple of hand tools. I don’t have the machinery that a tannery has, especially thinning machines that help to make leather soft. Although many of the skins I tan myself, such as goats, turn out a bit stiff, they can still be used as rugs and chair throws, even if they are not soft enough for clothing.

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